Longwater Trail 

Share on Facebook
Tweet
Submit to Reddit
Email
The Longwater Trail, trail 619 hike.
OF 17
PREV NEXT
Bob Falcone
Just under 5 miles from US 24, turn right off of CR77 onto FS 210. FS210 is not marked until the road enters the treeline.
Bob Falcone
You'll know you're on the right road if you see the 210 marker immediately after crossing the cattle guard right at treeline. When dry, FS210 is passable by anything from crossover SUV (think Subaru Outback or similar), and larger.
Bob Falcone
The trailhead at the end of FS 210. The start of the trail is indicated by the arrow.
Bob Falcone
The beginning of Longwater/Trail 619. All distances were GPS measured from here.
Bob Falcone
Almost immediately, the trail goes through stands of new-growth aspens. The fire damage that still exists on the hill is sharp contrast to the new growth below it.
Bob Falcone
At just under .70 miles the trail goes by a watering spot for cattle. Keep these to your left as the trail bends to the right as it goes past here.
Bob Falcone
At about 1 mile, the trail goes up this drainage.
Bob Falcone
At about 1.15 miles the trail crests a low rise and through an area with a mix of fire damage and new growth. Pikes Peak is visible in the distance.
Bob Falcone
At 1.3 miles you'll pass this warning sign. This is still very far above any water, so flash flooding isn't a factor here. The bulk of the downhill part of the hike starts just past this sign.
Bob Falcone
You will encounter obstructions like this at various places along the trail. On my trip, I removed a number of smaller trees that were across the trail.
Bob Falcone
At about 2.1 miles the trail goes to the left of this large rock formation. From here, the trail is a long series of switchbacks and is steeper and consists of more loose skree than the trail up to this point.
Bob Falcone
Panorama of the long valley below, as seen from the trail after passing the large rock formation.
Bob Falcone
If you continue to the end, your destination is indicated by the arrow, at the South Platte River, which isn't visible, and won't be for some time.
Bob Falcone
At just over 3 miles the trail meets this 4 wheel drive road. Although unmarked, maps indicate it is Forest Service road 221B. Turn left here. Maps and the COTREX app indicate that the trail follows the road for a short distance before leaving the road for the rest of the trip to the Tarryall Creek. In fact, the rest of trail 619 no longer exists, and the remainder of the hike is on 221B to South Platte River
Bob Falcone
The next .75 miles down FS 221B is even steeper than the previous parts of this hike, before coming to the South Platte River at Hackett Crossing. Take the 4wd road around to the left (west ) to get to Tarryall Creek at Tarryall Crossing, about a quarter mile away. To get to the actual confluence of the waterways requires a bit of bushwhacking. Be aware of flash flooding when in this area.
Bob Falcone
While down at the water, take a long break and eat a snack before starting the long, steep climb back. Watch for this sign on FS 221B and pick up trail 619 for the remainder of the hike back. If you go from Hackett Crossing, to Tarryall Crossing, to the confluence and then start back up, your hike will be about 8.25 miles.
Bob Falcone
The GPS track of this hike.
More slideshows
Bob Falcone6 images
Bob Falcone16 images
Bob Falcone11 images
Bob Falcone10 images
1/17
Bob Falcone
Just under 5 miles from US 24, turn right off of CR77 onto FS 210. FS210 is not marked until the road enters the treeline.

Add a comment

Clicky Quantcast