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WarGames: 25th Anniversary Edition (PG)
MGM Home Entertainment
Thankfully, our planet is still here, 25 years after the release of WarGames. 'Cause when it first hit theaters, its premise didn't seem that outrageous. Matthew Broderick plays David Lightman, a brainy high school kid who inadvertently hacks into NORAD's computer defense system and starts a "game" called "Global Thermonuclear War." Yikes. Back then, the film made both world affairs and those newfangled desktop computers seem terrifying. Now with the Cold War over, it's easier to simply enjoy the film's fast action, crisp writing and charming performances (Ally Sheedy as Lightman's love interest, Barry Corbin as the NORAD general). As one of the first techno-thrillers, it's worth another watch, along with the commentary and "making of" interviews featuring the cast, crew and NORAD bigwigs. Jill Thomas


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WarGames: The Dead Code (PG-13)
MGM Home Entertainment
Billed as a "sequel" to the original WarGames, this new straight-to-DVD flick from director Stuart Gillard is really more of a modern-day rehashing of the story, sans tension and charm. Now, instead of the Cold War we've got the War on Terror. Instead of WOPR, the NORAD computer that politely asked hackers, "Shall we play a game?" we've got RIPLEY, a computer with an animated hostess who suggestively solicits computer nerds to "Play with me, baby." And instead of innocent, but intelligent, teens who almost stumble into war, we've got smarmy, trash-talking teens who spout lines like, "Why don't you go make out with your cross-eyed girlfriend, penis." We've also got trash-talking government officials, trash-talking girlfriends and even trash-talking moms. This one actually leaves you wondering ... was saving this kind of world really worth it? Jill Thomas


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The Inglorious Bastards (3-Disc Explosive Edition) (NR)
Severin Films
A lost classic of the '70s anti-hero war movie boom that included films such as The Dirty Dozen, this Italian entry directed by Enzo G. Castellari is being released in a three-disc special edition for the first time in the United States. Why the fanfare? Because a quasi-remake to be directed by none other than Quentin Tarantino is in the works! B-movie stalwarts Bo Svenson and Fred Williamson lead a motley crew of dangerous army deserters behind enemy lines in an effort to get to Switzerland. Along the way, they shoot up, in blood-red glory, dozens of Nazi bastards. Special features include a conversation between Tarantino and legendary action director Castellari; a full-length "making-of" documentary; and, what I really like, a CD of the film's Sousa-esque soundtrack music. Louis Fowler

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