Culture » Literature

Christine Flores finds expression and audience through zines

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Christine Flores made her first foray into zine publication just last summer. Her impetus? An invitation from Han Sayles (a friend of friends and, at the time, manager of now-closed Mountain Fold Books) to participate in the bookshop’s 2016 Colorado Springs Comic and Zine Fest.

“I hadn’t really shared my work publicly,” says Flores, though she’s been drawing since childhood. “I thought it would be fun to participate — and also saw it as an opportunity to establish myself as an artist in the community.”

Flores knew little about zines at the time. But, after researching the process, she knew it was a project she wanted to try. She designed and printed her first zines at a local copy store, and her works were met with enthusiasm by Zine Fest attendees.

“It’s an art form that’s more accessible,” says Flores, who also participated in this year’s Zine Fest at Ladyfingers Letterpress. “It’s relatively inexpensive compared to other art forms like wash or oil painting... With zines, it can be as easy as finding scrap paper in the recycling bin, doodling on the back and making photocopies at the library.”

Flores uses a combination of illustration and prose in her work, creating pieces related to her experiences and feelings. Although she describes many of her zines as emotionally fraught post-love pieces, her favorite zine, titled Doodles and Noodles is far happier fare. It features things that Flores says make her smile, like dogs, vegetables she’s collected and other such imagery.

“I’ve made a lot of my work from a place of heartbreak, and I like that work,” she says, “but it’s definitely nice to make things that are fun and light.”

Flores currently has ink pen and marker illustrations as well as zines on display at Ladyfingers Letterpress, in a show titled Space: Works on Paper.

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