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A string of country performers highlights a week of benefits

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This is a week for local benefits, including country hitmaker Easton Corbin’s July 11 performance at the Pikes Peak Center on behalf of the Empty Stocking Fund. - CHAPMAN BACHLER
  • Chapman Bachler
  • This is a week for local benefits, including country hitmaker Easton Corbin’s July 11 performance at the Pikes Peak Center on behalf of the Empty Stocking Fund.
The Pikes Peak Center’s recent string of country performers rolls on when singer-songwriter Easton Corbin makes a stop on Wednesday, July 11, joined by duo Walker McGuire and fellow singer-songwriters Jillian Jacqueline and Carlton Anderson. Corbin, a Florida native, has been a consistent country chart-topper since his self-titled 2010 debut album, which boasted two No. 1 U.S. Country hits with “A Little More Country Than That” and “Roll With It.”

While Corbin hasn’t released a full-length album since 2015’s About to Get Real, he’s continued to make noise on the country charts with his 2017 single “A Girl Like You.” The Pikes Peak Center show, arranged by Jon Eddy Productions, will be one of several concerts benefiting the Empty Stocking Fund.

Speaking of benefits, Friday, July 13, finds a very timely concert hosted by grassroots nonprofit HOME: Humans Optimistically Motivating Each-Other, to raise money for and awareness of separated immigrant families. The show, titled “No Child Is Illegal: Benefit to Reunite Families,” takes place at Bar-K and features an array of local talent, including the popular and prolific “trashgrass” outfit Tejon Street Corner Thieves, experimental guitarist/aural magician Mobdividual, emcee and activist Kevin Mitchell and “artisanal sadcore folx-doom” performer Josephine the Singer. There will also be a silent auction and raffle for items that include Spanish lessons from Jerima King, jewelry from Terram Jewels and posters from Zooma Design.

All proceeds from the show will go directly to the Colorado Immigrant Rights Coalition. Mitchell, when describing the need for the benefit, certainly doesn’t mince words: “America has a history of kidnapping children from their families — they’ve stolen children from indigenous families, they stole children from enslaved families. So it’s abundantly clear that when [people] ride their high horse and speak about ‘family values’ and ‘family togetherness,’ that they only speak for whiteness.”

Also on July 13, Mother Muff’s will host a performance by the local Americana group Red Moon Rounders. The band, which started out as an acoustic duo in 2015 and has since expanded to a quartet, put out a very strong self-titled EP in May, and opened for Great American Taxi’s stop at Ivywild earlier this spring.

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