Bill would give "Dreamers" a path to citizenship

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"Dreamer" Oscar Guerrero-Olivares (right) was arrested by ICE agents in January. - COURTESY OF THE GUERRERO-OLIVARES FAMILY
  • Courtesy of the Guerrero-Olivares family
  • "Dreamer" Oscar Guerrero-Olivares (right) was arrested by ICE agents in January.
Colorado has more than 17,000 "Dreamers" — people who entered the country illegally as children — who've received temporary protection from deportation under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program since it was implemented in 2012 through an executive order by President Barack Obama.

They account for about 1.9 percent of the country's Dreamers with DACA status, all of whom have been left in limbo since then.

While several court injunctions remain in place to require the federal government to keep processing DACA renewals — necessary every two years — the administration of President Donald Trump halted new applications in September of 2017, and sought to terminate the program altogether.

A piece of legislation championed by House Democrats would provide Dreamers with a pathway to citizenship, though it has almost zero possibility of passing in the Republican-controlled Senate or of being signed into law by Trump.




The Dream and Promise Act of 2019, introduced March 12, would provide up to 10 years of conditional permanent residence status for Dreamers who met certain criteria. It would also grant lawful permanent residence to people with Temporary Protected Status (2,900 in Colorado alone, according to the Immigration Hub) and Deferred Enforced Departure designations, meaning they cannot return to their countries due to unsafe conditions.


Among the bill's other objectives, according to a fact sheet from the Immigration Hub, an advocacy organization:

• Cancel deportation proceedings for Dreamers who meet certain requirements and background checks.
• Grant lawful permanent residence to Dreamers who pursue higher education, join the military or meet employment requirements.
• Allow Dreamers to receive federal financial aid, as well as professional, commercial and business licenses.
• Allow certain Dreamers deported under the Trump administration to apply for relief from abroad.
• Cancel deportation proceedings for people with TPS and DED status who have been in the U.S. at least three years, for people who had TPS or were eligible on Sept. 25, 2016, and for people who had DED status on Sept. 28, 2016.

If this bill has no chance of becoming law, why is it important? Vox argues "it’s a statement of the Democratic consensus on immigration" that will be important if Republicans try to pass their own immigration bill, and as presidential candidates set their priorities for 2020.

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