UPDATE: Poll shows support for Colorado Springs stormwater fee

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Stormwater work on Monument Branch in the Northgate area— Voyager north of Middle Creek Parkway. This project was listed under the Intergovernmental Agreement with Pueblo County, which is designed to significantly reduce the amount of sediment entering Monument Creek and involves some work to address runoff concerns at the Air Force Academy. Phase 1 of this project was completed in April. - COURTESY CITY OF COLORADO SPRINGS
  • Courtesy city of Colorado Springs
  • Stormwater work on Monument Branch in the Northgate area— Voyager north of Middle Creek Parkway. This project was listed under the Intergovernmental Agreement with Pueblo County, which is designed to significantly reduce the amount of sediment entering Monument Creek and involves some work to address runoff concerns at the Air Force Academy. Phase 1 of this project was completed in April.
UPDATE:

This just in on the poll:

Invest in COS, a group of community leaders backing a proposal to improve Colorado Springs’ stormwater drainage and flood control infrastructure, conducted a statistically-valid poll last week to assess voter knowledge of stormwater and attitudes toward a proposed fee to fund improvements.

The poll revealed the following:
59 percent of likely voters say they would vote yes on a proposed fee and 36 percent say they would vote no.
Even after hearing potential negative messages, 54 percent say they would vote yes.
Six percent said they are undecided, both before and after hearing messages.
Voters are very informed about stormwater drainage and flood control issues, and understand how a lack of maintenance drives up costs and threatens other infrastructure like roads and bridges, endangers public safety, and affects other city budget priorities, such as police staffing.
“Colorado Springs doesn’t have the dedicated funds we need to control dangerous floods, and our infrastructure has deteriorated for decades,” said Mayor John Suthers. “Funding stormwater in a separate, dedicated fund will address long-standing maintenance issues. We’re the only city in the country that doesn’t fund stormwater this way. It’s time to repair our crumbling stormwater drainage and free up money in the city’s budget for other priorities like hiring more police officers.”

Colorado Springs City Council will finalize changes to the existing stormwater enterprise and determine ballot language for the fee proposal at its meeting on Aug. 22. The proposal would generate $17-18 million per year for 20 years to be used exclusively for stormwater drainage and flood control, including a list of 71 projects. Funds would be generated through a $5 per month fee for residential properties and $30 per acre per month for non-residential development. Use of funds will be overseen by a citizen committee.

The poll, led by the Colorado Springs Chamber and EDC, was conducted of 400 2017 likely Colorado Springs voters by The Tarrance Group. See the attached graphs for more poll data.
———————-ORIGINAL POST 3:02 P.M. MONDAY, AUG. 14, 2017———————-

A poll conducted last week shows voters are well informed on the city's need to fix its stormwater system, and 58 percent say they'd vote "yes" on a measure to impose a fee to fund it.

So says City Council President Richard Skorman following a meeting Monday to learn the latest figures from the poll, which was funded by the local business community and surveyed 400 likely voters.

"When we read them the ballot language, it was 58 to 38," Skorman says, referring to the percentages in favor and against. When pros and cons were shared, the approval rating fell to 54 percent and opposition rose to 40 percent. Only 6 percent, he says, were undecided.

Another portion of the poll tested voters' trust of City Council and Mayor John Suthers, which Skorman reported was "high."

All of that translates to a high likelihood that voters will see the measure on the Nov. 7 ballot, Skorman says.

The measure would charge residential properties $5 per month, while assessing all other property $30 per acre, though some concession would be made for property that's pervious.


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