UPDATE: Colorado Springs city election spawns a flurry of signs

by

5 comments
cityelectionsbug-web_360.png
UPDATE:
We just heard from the city via email regarding whether a sign permit was obtained:

Ms. Jack did not apply for such a permit. We typically learn of violations of the City Code regulations via citizen complaints.

When a complaint comes in, as long as we have all of the information needed, the City will notify the offender and ask them to remove the sign or Code Enforcement Officers will go out and remove the sign in question.
————-ORIGINAL POST, 5:10 P.M., APRIL 3 ——————————

As the election comes to its crescendo, we find a bunch of signs everywhere, even in our front yard.

It's worth noting that spotting campaign signs in public rights-of-way is nothing new. It usually happens every election.

But a blatant admission is another thing entirely.

On Sunday, Colorado Springs Business Journal reporter John Hazlehurst came to work at CSBJ's Nevada Avenue offices shared with the Independent to get a jump on the week. He was greeted by an army of signs for Chuck Fowler and Lynette Crow-Iverson in front of our building.

The irony of this is that while the Business Journal doesn't endorse candidates in elections, the Independent does and did not endorse either of those whose signs were posted here.

Hazlehurst reports via Facebook he took the signs down "and cached 'em in our evidence room!"

Sarah Jack, a paid consultant for both Fowler's and Crow-Iverson's campaigns, piped up with this, "Get a sense of humor John."

When Hazlehurst tells her the security cams caught the whole thing, Jack says this:

"I did it.... They[y] were in the city right of way. So sue me."

Here's the exchange:
screen_shot_2017-04-03_at_3.56.42_pm.png

Which begs the question, is that legal? Can someone post signs wherever they want?

We asked the city about that and were referred to the Planning and Development Department, which regulates what is placed on city rights-of-way.

The short answer is as long as someone gets a permit, they can post campaign signs all over town, including in public rights-of-way, no problem.

Here's the long version from the city:
With regards to election signs within public rights-of-way, temporary signs are allowed within the City right-of-way with approval of a revocable permit in accord with Section 3.2.217.D of the City Code however there are regulations that must be followed. There are two separate applications; one for signs of six square feet or less and another for signs larger than six square feet. The difference between the two types of signs is that the City needs to review the placement of any sign larger than six square feet so that they are not placed within the sight visibility triangle because the sign can restrict the visibility of pedestrians and vehicular traffic. Some of the rules and regulations for sign placement include:
· No signs are allowed within the medians of any public right-of-way;
· The size of the sign(s) are based on the zone of the adjacent property;
· Signs are not allowed on or in front of City of Colorado Springs or Colorado Springs Utilities owned property which includes Park land and Open Space;
· Signs are not allowed within the right-of-way of State highways, i.e. I-25, Hwy 21 (Powers), Hwy 115 (portions of Nevada), etc.;
· Adjacent property permission is required.
The city didn't mention whether Jack, Fowler and Crow-Iverson have obtained the necessary permits. But it's pretty standard procedure to do so; thus, we'd be shocked if Jack didn't tend to that detail on behalf of her clients.

Still, we've asked the city that question and will update if and when we hear back.

——————————-

If you haven't already, please vote in this election. Balloting closes at 7 p.m. on Tuesday.
For more, go to this site.

Comments (5)

Showing 1-5 of 5

Add a comment
 

Add a comment

Clicky Quantcast