UPDATE: Colorado Springs still waiting to be paid by Slide the City

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Slide the City has drawn thousands in Colorado Springs. - CARMERON MOIX
  • Carmeron Moix
  • Slide the City has drawn thousands in Colorado Springs.
UPDATE:
UpaDowna executive Steve Hitchcock reports that the organization was paid Wednesday night via credit card by Slide the City, which is owned by Sack Lunch Productions.

The city also reports it got paid as well on Wednesday.

No word from Colorado Springs Utilities so far. Utilities, too, reports having been paid what was owed from last year.

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UPDATE:
City spokeswoman Kim Melchor advises in an email, "I do want to add that the City continually works to collect outstanding balances from events and any organizer will have to pay past due balances and 50% est. police costs if they want to return."

And Colorado Springs Utilities says in an email, "Like the City, they would have to fulfill their financial obligations to us for 2016 before we would grant them a 2017 permit."

————-ORIGINAL POST 2:31 P.M., TUESDAY, FEB. 21, 2017—————————-

Wednesday, we will report that UpaDowna, a nonprofit that hosts outdoor events and advocates for a respect for the environment, got stiffed by Slide the City last year.

Remember that water slide down 21st Street?

Well, UpaDowna provided some 60 volunteers to run the event, as well as doing other jobs before and after the August event, and were to receive a $3,600 donation. but six months later, it's still waiting to be paid.

Now we learn that's not the half of it.

Slide the City, which is owned and operated by Sack Lunch Productions, also owes:

• $1,400 to Colorado Springs Utilities for water (approximately 149,500 gallons) and commodity charges and other fees, Utilities reports. Spokesman Steve Berry says Utilities can't charge in advance because it doesn't know how much water will be used.

•  $6,350 to the city of Colorado Springs for police coverage of the event and $50 for the application fee. "Because police costs are invoiced for the actual hours worked, we are not able to invoice events for police services in advance of the event," says city employee Carly Kobasiar via email.

But Kobasiar said that if Slide the City returns with an event this year, "they must remit the full balance-due before a permit will be issued. We would also require that 50% of the estimated police costs be paid in advance."

She adds, "At this point, we have not received a Special Event Application from Slide the City for 2017, nor have they contacted us regarding dates/availability."

Slide the City has every intention of returning, says Sack Lunch Productions CEO Richard Surber, who returned the Independent's call Tuesday afternoon from last week.

Surber says UpaDowna and everyone else will be paid, "probably today."

"We just got a little bit behind," he adds. "We weren't able to open some anticipated events, and we're catching up now. We'll pay whatever is owed. We're a little bit late, but we never had any intention of not handling our obligation. We'd like to come back. Colorado Springs has been good to us."

Surber says he's been in touch with all those he owes by phone and is "working it all out, at this point."

"This is one of the pitfalls with this business," he says, "it's seasonal. A number of events didn't work out as we'd hoped. Colorado Springs did."

In Wednesday's edition of the Independent, we include a report on Sack Lunch Productions' latest quarterly financial report that shows its raked in millions.

El Paso County reports that it did, in fact, receive money for use of Bear Creek pavilions and a donation for dog park maintenance.

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