Ranch Foods Direct recalls 1,290 pounds of beef

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A phrase nobody wants to hear. - SHUTTERSTOCK
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  • A phrase nobody wants to hear.
On Monday, August 7, Ranch Foods Direct issued a Class I recall for 1,290 pounds of Callcrate beef, citing possible contamination with E. Coli. According to the USDA, a Class I recall is issued for "a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death." E. Coli certainly fits that bill.

"We place food safety as our highest priority," says RFD owner Mike Callicrate of the recall. "I wish we could be perfect, but will continue to do the absolute best job we can in providing healthy local food."

Regarding what might have caused the possible contamination, Callicrate says "[E. Coli] bacteria is common in the environment. Somehow it made its way past our interventions. All we can do is keep working to tighten our procedures. We begin with good care and humane treatment of our livestock and end with clean, low stress on farm processing."

If you purchased the affected products, all packaged on August 3 and 4 and marked with lot code 170731CC, return or dispose of them. Read the full text of the press release below:
CLASS I RECALL
HEALTH RISK: HIGH

Congressional and Public Affairs
Veronika Medina (202) 720-9113

Press@fsis.usda.gov
FSIS-RC-089-2017



GOOD FOOD CONCEPTS, LLC. RECALLS BEEF PRODUCTS

DUE TO POSSIBLE E. COLI O26 CONTAMINATION



WASHINGTON, Aug. 7, 2017 – Good Food Concepts, LLC., a Colorado Springs, Colo. establishment, is recalling approximately 1,290 pounds of raw intact and non-intact beef because the products may be contaminated withE. coli O26, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.


The raw intact and non-intact beef items were processed and packaged on Aug. 3 and Aug. 4, 2017. The following products are subject to recall:


Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, Filet Mignon,” with lot code 170731CC.
Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, Brisket Flat,” with lot code 170731CC.
Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, Sirloin Tip,” with lot code 170731CC.
Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, Ribeye,” with lot code 170731CC.
Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, Stew Meat,” with lot code 170731CC.
Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, New York Strip,” with lot code 170731CC.
Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, Skirt Steak,” with lot code 170731CC.
Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, Top Sirloin,” with lot code 170731CC.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 27316” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations, wholesale locations, and restaurants in Colorado Springs, Colorado.


The problem was discovered on Aug. 5, 2017 when plant management at Good Food Concepts, LLC notified FSIS in-plant inspection personnel that they tested a production lot of carcasses they received from the Callicrate Ranch on July 31, 2017. The carcass trimmings from the N60 analysis was positive for E. coli O26 and non-O157.


Many clinical laboratories do not test for non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), such as STEC O26 because it is harder to identify than STEC O157. People can become ill from STECs 2–8 days (average of 3–4 days) after consuming the organism. Most people infected with STEC O26 develop diarrhea (often bloody), and vomiting. Some illnesses last longer and can be more severe. Infection is usually diagnosed by testing of a stool sample. Vigorous rehydration and other supportive care is the usual treatment; antibiotic treatment is generally not recommended.


Most people recover within a week, but, rarely, some develop a more severe infection. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is uncommon with STEC O26 infection. HUS can occur in people of any age but is most common in children under 5 years old, older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately


FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers' freezers.


Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.


FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify theircustomers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.


Media and consumers with questions regarding the recall can contact Dave Anderson, Operations Manager, at (719) 322-5945.


Consumers with food safety questions can "Ask Karen," the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

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