These schools are the best bet for vets

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My husband's grandfather fought in World War II, where he helped free a concentration camp.

It was a defining moment for him, but painful enough that he didn't talk much about it until recently. Now, in his 90s, he's reconnected with some of his war buddies, written down memories from the war, and collected pictures from that time period to share with his family. It's amazing to listen to him talk about the war, and to learn how that experience shaped him into the person he became.

But David's life wasn't just that war. He was lucky enough to come home from those battles, to father four children with his wonderful wife, and to have a career as a school principal. On Veterans Day, we often think only of soldiers at war. But like David, most of them come home with their entire lives ahead of them.

So, what happens then? Well, certainly many vets want to further their education so they can enter a career of their choice, but vets have special needs and challenges. That's why the Military Times releases an annual list of the Top 175 colleges for veterans. This year's list doesn't put any Colorado school in the highest rank, but many of our state's colleges were good enough to make the list. 

In a Top 125 list of 4-year colleges (in which the University of Nebraska at Omaha took the No. 1 spot), Colorado State University (in Fort Collins) took No. 13, University of Colorado at Denver / Anschutz Medical Campus took No. 27, Metropolitan State University of Denver took No. 49, and University of Colorado at Colorado Springs took No. 90. In a Top 25 of Online and Nontraditional Schools, Colorado Technical University took No. 17. And, in a Top 25 of 2-year Schools, Pikes Peak Community College took No. 17. 

The Military Times says it uses a complex formula to rank the schools:

As always, we used a rigorous, more-than-120-question survey to evaluate schools. In addition, newly released public data allowed us to consider more information, from more sources, than ever before as part of the process.

We pulled data from the Veterans Affairs Department, Defense Department and three Education Department databases for information on everything from veteran-related policies to average salaries after graduation.
(To learn more about what makes a school succeed with veterans, read the entire Military Times article here.)

While it may not have been at the very top of the pack, UCCS was excited to place in the contest for the second year in a row. A press release noted, "UCCS has an estimated 2,000 students who are veterans, active duty or have ties to the military. The university is in the process of expanding office space dedicated to assisting veterans and has implemented numerous programs and training to help faculty assist veterans with their transition into the classroom."

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