Photographing with Simon Andrews

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The trouble with being left-brained, photographer Simon Andrews says, is that it takes work to be creative.

SIMON ANDREWS
  • Simon Andrews
“For someone who is left-brained, you work hard all year at being more creative and at the end of that year you will be just a little more creative than you were when you started the year,” he explains to me in his downtown studio.

But if you’re right-brained? "I can teach you all of the things you need to know quickly,” he says. 

Simon Andrews is the founder of the Colorado Photography School and readily admits he is a left-brainer. He caught the photo bug growing up in the UK and watching his Dad take pictures.  

“His camera was a mythical object for me,” he says. With all those dials and knobs it was a source of fascination. His Dad made some pretty great pictures with it.

For Andrews, using a digital camera for the first time was a watershed moment. “It allowed me to practice a lot more and I didn’t have to spend a fortune on developing and film.” 

He moved to Colorado Springs with his wife 10 years ago. Working as a computer programmer, he changed course and became a professional photographer. 

“I decided to find the thing I like to do, and that was photography.” 

He began work as a wedding photographer with New Concept Photography. But one Saturday, four years ago, he offered a landscape class just for fun. The success of that class and his second love, teaching, spawned the creation of the Colorado Photography School. 

There are a wide range of offerings at the school, he says. “I’ve designed the courses so that anyone, including total beginners, may take them. And if they aspire to become a professional photographer in a niche they enjoy, they can.” 

He readily admits that photography and teaching are not as lucrative as computer programming. But it does give him more enjoyment and it affords him the lifestyle he wants. 

While he’s redirected his focus to teaching photography, Andrews still enjoys photographing professionally. He’s quick to point out that wedding photography is not for everyone. “You have to be a bit of entertainer at a wedding,” he says, "and if you don’t enjoy weddings then definitely don’t do them.”  

Andrews loves Colorado and the photographic opportunities like easy access to the desert southwest, but admits to missing his home in England.

“I love Colorado,” he says, “but I really miss the ocean. I used to sit on a rock and stare for hours at the waves.” One of his favorite pictures is a black-and-white image of lighthouse near where he grew up in England. 

“For me this picture is not as much about the lighthouse as it is about my feelings for home,” says Andrews. "This is one of the pictures I keep at the school. I can take a trip to the ocean anytime I want.” 

Colorado Springs wedding photographer Sean Cayton loves remarkable photographs and the stories behind them. You can see his wedding work at caytonphotography.com, his personal work at seancayton.com and his editorial work in the Colorado Springs Independent. Submit your photo and the story behind the image — no more than two a week, please — tosean@caytonphotography.com for consideration in upcoming blogs.

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