Miro and Wyeth coming to the DAM next year

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Miro's "Woman Entranced by the Escape of Shooting Stars"  from 1969. - MUSEO NACIONAL CENTRO DE ARTE REINA SOFÍA. © SUCCESSIÓ MIRÓ / ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK / ADAGP, PARIS 2014.
  • Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía. © Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris 2014.
  • Miro's "Woman Entranced by the Escape of Shooting Stars" from 1969.

Oh my lord, it's so exciting. Here are the details:

• Joan Miró: Instinct & Imagination (March 22 through June 28, 2015)

This show will focus on the Miró's later career, between 1963 and 1981, and is largely composed of paintings, drawings and sculpture. It's organized by the Seattle Art Museum and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia in Madrid (I've been there, and it's lovely) — the latter's the source for all the artwork — and will bring over 50 works into the United States (such as the one above), including sculpture that rarely travels outside Europe.

Miró, who often stands in the shadow of 20th century Spanish great Picasso, usually hits people in the "whimsy" categories, and that's not untrue, but it made him less popular in the decades following his death. Jonathan Jones, who covers art in The Guardian, came to his defense in 2010 in advance of a retrospective happening at the Tate Modern:
He was a genius. To follow his paintings from his early hyper-intense Catalan landscapes in which the earth teems with manic life to his primordial abstractions that seem to reach to the very bottom of the ancestral seas where life evolved, as if all the universe and its history were buried in the cells of our brains, is to see an artist of fantastic power and raw vision penetrate the remotest corners of human knowing.
Miró's best known for works like "Carnival of Harlequin," which actually came to Colorado this past year as part of the DAM's Modern Masters show that borrowed from the Albright-Knox Gallery (read what we wrote about that show here).
Andrew Wyeth's "Faraway" - © ANDREW WYETH. PHYLLIS AND JAMIE WYETH COLLECTION
  • © Andrew Wyeth. Phyllis and Jamie Wyeth Collection
  • Andrew Wyeth's "Faraway"
• Wyeth: Andrew and Jamie in the Studio (Nov. 8 through Feb. 7, 2016)

Perhaps your main entree into the work of Andrew Wyeth is Snoopy's purchase of one following the loss of his Van Gogh when his doghouse burned down. But Andrew Wyeth is in a class all his own, mastering the extraordinarily tough media of watercolor and egg tempera to create hyperrealistic depictions of the lonely beauty of his home in Chadds Ford, Pa. He is best known for his Helga painting series and the iconic "Christina's World" that resides at the Museum of Modern Art.

His son, Jamie, is also an artist, and makes up the third direct generation of Wyeth artists, beginning with Andrew's father N.C., who was also a well-known illustrator.

This "unprecedented" show is organized by the DAM and "the first exhibition to deeply examine the common threads that run through their works, while illuminating each artist’s distinctive practice," goes the press release. With over 100 works (including "Faraway," above) in media ranging from pen and ink to watercolor and drybrush to mixed media, oil paint and graphite, the show "explores the connection between two artists who are inextricably linked by their shared artistic habits of mind, while each maintaining his own unique artistic voice,” says DAM curator Timothy J. Standring (the man behind 2012's Becoming Van Gogh) in the release.

Following the premiere in Denver, the show will travel to the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid (also a beautiful institution — and if you haven't guessed it by now, Madrid is an art historian's dream).


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