UPDATE: Concentrates bill advances, edibles bill fails

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The Colorado Senate appropriations committee is advancing bills for marijuana-related studies and focus groups. - SHUTTERSTOCK/AMBIENT IDEAS
  • Shutterstock/Ambient Ideas
  • The Colorado Senate appropriations committee is advancing bills for marijuana-related studies and focus groups.
Update: Governor Hickenlooper has signed both the concentrates bill and the edibles bill as of yesterday. Regulations from both bills will go into effect January 1, 2016. 

-––ORIGINAL POST: FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1:18 P.M. ––-

House Bill 1361, the Regulation of Marijuana Concentrates bill (see What's Inside an Ounce), has moved through two Senate committees unamended to be discussed by the Senate as a whole.

With the legislative session ending this coming Wednesday, May 7, don't be surprised if it gets approved on Monday. Save for adding the financial appropriation to the actual text of the amendment, this bill has been unchanged since it was introduced on April 7.

Less intact is House Bill 1366, which originally mandated that all edibles have to be clearly marked, stamped or colored to indicate that they contain marijuana.

According to a KRCC report from Bente Birkeland this morning, legislators could not come to an agreement on how to mark edibles. As such, the bill now mandates that the State Licensing Authority will bring a board of stakeholders together to discuss how to mark edibles. The bill says this will take place July 1, 2014. As of now, the amended bill has been referred to the Senate as a whole. 

The State Legislature is showing itself to be very resolved to discuss Colorado's growing industry. However, it doesn't seem to be taking much action just now. Between the fact that 1361 is a one-time appropriation, 1366 is now a marked date for an industry discussion, and the marijuana banking bill, House Bill 1398, is now essentially dead, nothing is actually changing.

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