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Movie picks

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Films recommended by our reviewers are indicated by an *.

The Adventures of Tintin (PG)

Visually, Tintin offers an exponential leap in the potential for motion-capture adventure, with action set pieces. But there are vacant human spaces in the center. It's like Raiders of the Lost Ark, if Indiana Jones had been played by Taylor Lautner. — Scott Renshaw

Chapel Hills 15, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (G)

After surviving the sinking of their cruise ship, Alvin, Simon and Theodore must survive on a Polynesian island. — Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

Beauty and the Beast (G)

A chance to catch Walt Disney Pictures' 30th animated film on the big screen once again. — Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

Contraband (R)

Chris Farraday long ago abandoned his life of crime, but after his brother-in-law, Andy, botches a drug deal, Chris is forced back in. — Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

Courageous (PG-13)

Four cops tackle fatherhood, raising life's big questions and challenges. — Not reviewed

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*The Descendants (R)

The film is an almost dirge-like story about grief, but so much more than that. George Clooney plays Matt King, a Hawaiian real-estate baron; it's a triumph for all, especially the audience. — Justin Strout

Hollywood Interquest

The Devil Inside (R)

In 1989, emergency responders received a 9-1-1 call from Maria Rossi confessing that she had brutally killed three people. Twenty years later, her daughter Isabella seeks to understand the truth about what happened that night. — Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

Dolphin Tale (PG)

Swimming free, a young dolphin is caught in a crab trap, severely damaging her tail. This is the amazing true story of a brave dolphin and the compassionate strangers who banded together to save her life. — Not reviewed

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*Footloose (PG-13)

The fidelity with which this film attempts to reproduce the original is something rarely seen in contemporary remakes. And by virtue of doing very little that's different, it does a whole lot right. — Scott Renshaw

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*The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (R)

The mood is by turns brooding and cheeky, the method technically exacting, the temperature not warm. The movie works briskly through its sadistic cycle of brutal violence, a very dark space in which actors lurk and give off glints of their charisma. — Jonathan Kiefer

Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

Happy Feet Two (PG)

Weirdness, as Rango proved, isn't an automatic deal-breaker when it comes to animated features. But nothing here coheres in a meaningful way. It's all a big pile of crazy, with no one scooping up after it. — Scott Renshaw

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The Help (PG-13)

Set in Mississippi in the '60s, a Southern society girl returns from college determined to become a writer, but turns her friends' lives upside down when she decides to interview the black women who have spent their lives taking care of prominent Southern families. — Not reviewed

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*Hugo (PG)

Hugo is about both the dreamers and the keepers, and a masterful clarion call for new ones like them, from a man (Martin Scorsese) who's been both. It's a deeply personal animated film that doesn't preach, and a majestic love letter to the cinema. — Justin Strout

Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Tinseltown

*Immortals (R)

Immortals is pretty much completely bonkers — that is its secret and its glory. It's sort of about mad King Hyperion, but what's important here isn't what's going on, but how what is going on is presented. The style is substantial, the meat of the meal here. And it is hugely intriguing. — MaryAnn Johanson

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The Iron Lady (PG-13)

The film waffles too much over what to do with Margaret Thatcher, and spends too much time on the seemingly obligatory montages of rioting laborers, soldiers in the Falklands and other events of the time. Meryl Streep's presence guarantees you won't doubt for a moment that you've seen the story of Thatcher; the rest of the film can't decide what that story is. — Scott Renshaw

Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Kimball's Peak Three, Tinseltown

Jack and Jill (PG)

Family man Jack (Adam Sandler) must deal with his twin sister, Jill, when she visits for Thanksgiving and then will not leave. — Not reviewed

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Joyful Noise (PG-13)

The small town of Pacashau, Ga., has fallen on hard times, but the people are counting on the Divinity Church Choir to lift their spirits by winning the National Joyful Noise Competition. — Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol (PG-13)

A bomb destroys the Kremlin and the IMF is blamed. Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) and his team must unravel the conspiracy. — Not reviewed

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

My Week with Marilyn (R)

With inert plotting and over-the-top supporting performances, Marilyn feels small and, frankly, dumb. But the prime culprit here can be found in post-production; the film is edited to within an inch of its life: In every scene, we come in too late and leave too early, and certain pivotal plot points are shown from nonsensically diverse viewpoints.— Justin Strout

Chapel Hills 15

Paranormal Activity 3 (R)

Two sisters try to make sense of the supernatural events they experienced as children. — Not reviewed

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Puss in Boots (PG)

Puss in Boots takes arguably the best part of the last two Shrek movies, stretches it as thin as can be, and leaves us hating cats. — Dan Hudak

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Real Steel (PG-13)

Hugh Jackman, in a story set in the near-future, where the sport of boxing has gone hi-tech. — Not reviewed

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*Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (PG-13)

Guy Ritchie's latest installment is fun, witty and, perhaps most shocking of all, occasionally restrained. It's more satisfying than its predecessor. — Scott Renshaw

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

The Sitter (R)

Jonah Hill has a wild night to remember when he agrees to babysit three challenging kids. — Not reviewed

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*Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (R)

Before Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy was a movie by Swedish director Tomas Alfredson, it was the definitively English Cold War espionage thriller. While a previous miniseries spanned five-plus hours, the movie, a bracing distillation, is rigorously concise. Its pace feels thick and slow, but in fact what's happening is a succession of brutally economical scenes. — Jonathan Kiefer

Kimball's Peak Three

*Tower Heist (PG-13)

I'm truly stunned by how much I love Tower Heist. But delightedly so. Seriously, see this movie and ask yourself why more big, silly entertainments can't be this smart. — MaryAnn Johanson

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War Horse (PG)

War Horse boasts plenty of terrific individual scenes, but Spielberg falls back on his old bag of tricks to make sure we grasp Significance: his trademark slow zoom-in; under-the-chin hero shots; glorious landscapes set to John Williams' music. — Scott Renshaw

Carmike 10, Chapel Hills 15, Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

We Bought a Zoo (PG)

Let's face it, when you take your family to the zoo, safe and predictable is exactly what you're looking for. It isn't, however, what you look for in a Cameron Crowe movie. — Anders Wright

Cinemark 16, Hollywood Interquest, Tinseltown

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