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Looks like MP3

Local rock group Looks Like Me releases album on Internet

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Thanks to the Internet, looks like Looks Like Me are on their way to national recognition.
  • Thanks to the Internet, looks like Looks Like Me are on their way to national recognition.

For a local band to be heard worldwide is one thing. For the same band to also be recording pioneers is quite another. Colorado Springs' own Looks Like Me will be playing on Saturday, June 26, at the downtown venue 32 Bleu in celebration of Reflections, a new CD that will feature their entire back catalog, as well as five or so new stowaways.

Here's the hook: While Reflections will exist as a CD, it will be recorded in an MP3 format, the first of its kind, enabling fans to "burn" (or copy) their own mixes and share with others.

The idea is to pass the word along. Still, singer/guitarist/songwriter Lance May acknowledges, "Exposure's only good if you're good." Looks Like Me (consisting of May, drummer Paul Oldfield, bassist Cory Davis, and guitarists Jeremy Wardell and Quinton Montgomery) has garnered numerous awards over the years, appearing fairly consistently on nearly every "Best Of" list in town. The press has often touted their musical style in the mind-numbingly vague category of "modern alternative." Descriptions of their music are no better at nailing it down and have ranged from "radio-ready" and "ethereal" to "dark and brooding."

The guys agree to the broad spectrum of description, concurring that they have a certain "schizophrenic" style.

"Our music is as broad as our influences," said Oldfield, who cites everyone from Pearl Jam and U2 to Jimi Hendrix and The Cult. "Whatever it means to the listener, that's what it means," May elaborated. "How can I possibly quantify my lyrics to a thousand people? It's completely subjective."

With the hoopla and litigation surrounding Napster.com and other Web sites that allow people to burn songs without paying the band for them, one would think that the topic of money would be a sore spot for any up-and-coming group. LLM disagrees with the lawsuits; instead, they're trying to figure out ways to make their music even more accessible.

"The economics of the music industry is ridiculous these days. It's millionaires fighting over pennies," said May. "I'm a big fan of peer-to-peer file sharing. Not every fan can come to a show, and [file sharing] is a way to bring the music to them."

The band often hands out singles at shows and has a rabidly supportive street team. This guerilla approach to marketing, in addition to their foray into file sharing, has certainly paid off in appreciation: Their Web site has been visited by people from 75 different countries, with many ordering CDs and T-shirts online. To date, their first two CDs have sold nearly 4,000 copies combined.

-- Kara Luger

capsule

Looks Like Me with Hissi Fit

32 Bleu, 32 S. Tejon St.

Saturday, June 26, at 9 p.m.

All ages

$5; 995-5664 or www.32Bleu.com

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