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Japanscapes

Colorado College hosts print expert

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Hiroshiges Evening Snow at Kambara will be the topic of discussion at Colorado College on Wednesday.
  • Hiroshiges Evening Snow at Kambara will be the topic of discussion at Colorado College on Wednesday.

The second installment in the always enlightening Landscape and the Built Environment lecture series at Colorado College will be a talk about Utagawa Hiroshige, a 19th-century woodblock printer and contemporary of Katsushika Hokusai whose stylized waves have become a part of international pop culture.

Christine Guth, visiting professor of art history, will discuss Hiroshige's 53 Stations of the Tokaido Road. The road was the primary route between Edo (now Tokyo) and Kyoto, and each of the prints depicts one of the stops along that route.

Hiroshige lived between 1797 and 1858 and is considered the greatest printmaker in the Ukiyo-e (popular) school of printmaking, even surpassing Hokusai in fame. He was best known for his expansive, stylized landscapes, which almost always had human figures and man-made architecture in the foreground, clearly illustrating the Japanese ideal of humanity's balanced interrelationship with nature.

Guth is the author of Art of Edo Japan: The Artist and the City, and the forthcoming Longfellow's Tattoos: Tourism, Collecting and Japan, due out in 2004. -- Noel Black

capsule "Inventing Japan: Hiroshige's 53 Stations of the Tokaido Road"

A lecture by Christine Guth

Packard Hall at Colorado College

(SW corner of Cascade Avenue and Cache La Poudre Street)

Wednesday, Oct. 1 at 7:30 p.m.

Free; Call 389-6606.

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