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Officer Down, Seven Psychopaths, Dirty Energy

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Officer Down

Officer Down (R)

Anchor Bay Home Entertainment

The perpetually disheveled Stephen Dorff is a bad-cop-gone-good who's set up in a Mobius-like figure-eight of double crosses, bad deals and mistaken identities in this gritty police thriller. While it's nowhere near as effective or as evocative as any of the last five David Ayer flicks, it's still a watchable, surprising documentation of the downfall of someone actually trying to do good. Dorff gives a subtle, if unwashed, performance as Callahan, a dirty detective who, when a bullet was bopped into his gut a year ago, realized he finally had a second chance and devoted it to being a better police officer (and family man, natch). But when his demons come back to haunt him, he finds himself down the same dark path, with even more disastrous results. Featuring an all-star cast that includes Dominic Purcell and James Woods, Officer Down will do the trick until End of Watch hits Redbox. — Louis Fowler

Seven Psychopaths

Seven Psychopaths (R)

Sony

Irish director-screenwriter Martin McDonagh has a beautiful way with words and isn't one to mince them. Until now, he's made one feature, the enormously satisfying In Bruges, and one short film. Each earned an Oscar nomination. So it's natural to wonder if it's a tad early for him to unleash his inside-baseball jab at the film industry. But he's made a marvel with Seven Psychopaths, which is also the title of the unwritten (yet already optioned and past deadline) screenplay-within-the-movie, to be penned by Colin Farrell's pompous Marty. Only a confident writer could treat this idea-stealing, alcoholic protagonist with so much patience. To put some meat on his script's bones, Marty meets with genuine psychopaths and becomes entangled in a darkly madcap web of violence, played full-tilt by the likes of Christopher Walken, Sam Rockwell, Tom Waits and Woody Harrelson. — Justin Strout

Dirty Energy

Dirty Energy (NR)

Cinema Libre

Many people consider our up-to-the-minute news-cycle an informational godsend that benefits society by keeping us continually informed about events in the world, and often one step ahead of what's going to happen. But the problem is that some of the most important stories are easily swept under the rug and completely forgotten as soon as the next big story comes along. Case in point: the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, better known as the BP disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. This documentary focuses on the personal struggles of the fishermen, families and workers who not only lived through the oil spill, but continue to struggle (even as some others who were exposed to the chemicals start to die off). Most of us saw the pictures and were concerned about the environmental impact to marine life, but Dirty Energy shows you that the human toll is becoming even worse. — Louis Fowler

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